Spring Planting Guide

March - May Spring Planting Season

Spring vegetable gardening in Houston is an exciting multi-month event. Explore the Texas Gardening Zone III Spring Planting Schedule, watering guidelines, best vegetables for Spring, and more. 

Photo Dec 04 08 05 25

Spring Planting Schedule

While several crops of each vegetable can be planted throughout the spring to allow for continued staggered harvests, you can begin prepping for your garden as early as late December/early January by starting Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Collards, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Peppers, Spinach, Tomatoes seeds indoors.

During this time you can also plant Asparagus Crowns, Garlic, Onion Sets, and Seed Potatoes directly in your garden.

Seeds already started indoors (with the exception of tomatoes and peppers) as well as Beans, Beets, Carrots, Peas, Radishes, and Turnips can be transplanted or seeded directly into the garden starting in late February.

In mid-to-late March you can plant Basil, Corn, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Gourds, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Pumpkins, Squash, Tomatoes, and Watermelons directly into your garden. 

Spring Planting Guide for Vegetable Crops, Texas Zone III

Vegetables
Planting Date
Asparagus
After Feb 1
Snap Beans, bush
Mar 5 – May 1
Snap Beans, pole
Mar 5 – Apr 15
Lima Beans
Mar 15 – Apr 15
Beets
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Broccoli
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Brussels sprouts
Not Recommended
Cabbage
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Carrots
Jan 15 – Mar 1
Cauliflower
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Swiss Chard
Feb 1 – Mar 10
Collards
Feb 1 – Mar 25
Corn, sweet
Feb 25 – May 1
Cucumber
Mar 5 – May 1
Eggplant
Mar 15 – May 1
Garlic
Not Recommended
Kohlrabi
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Lettuce
Feb 1 – Mar 15
Muskmelon/Cantaloupe
Mar 15 – May 1
Mustard
Feb 1 – Apr 1
Onion
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Parsley
Feb 1 – Mar 1
English Peas
Feb 1 – Mar 1
Southern Peas
Mar 25 – May 20
Pepper, transplants
Mar 15 – May 1
Potatoes
Feb 15 – Mar 1
Sweet Potatoes, slips
Apr 10 – May 15
Pumpkins
Apr 1 – Apr 20
Radish
Feb 1 – May 1
Spinach
Jan 1 – Feb 15
Summer Squash
Mar 5 – May 1
Winter Squash
Mar 5 – May 1
Tomatoes, transplants
Mar 15 – Apr 10
Turnips
Feb 1 – Mar 10
Watermelon
Mar 15 – May 1

Last Frost

According to the Farmers Almanac, the last frost in Houston is generally 2/18. 

Spring Watering Schedule

March, April, May: Water only once per week in the spring, if less than one inch of rainfall occurs.

Read our full Watering Guidelines to learn more.

lone-star-2028578_960_720_white

“You all can go to hell, and I will go to Texas.”

Best vegetables for Spring gardens

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cauliflower

Celery

Collards

Kale

Kohlrabi

Lettuce

Peppers

Spinach

Tomatoes

Asparagus Crowns

Garlic

Onion Sets

Seed Potatoes

Beans

Beets

Carrots

Peas

Radishes

Turnips

Basil

Corn

Cucumbers

Eggplant

Gourds

Melons

Okra

Peppers

Pumpkins

Squash

Tomatoes

Watermelons

Easily plan next year's garden

Find out how much soil you need today

nugget

Spring Gardening Care Tips

Mulch your beets, carrots, turnips, and parsnips before the ground freezes hard. Even if the vegetable tops wilt, the roots will survive with mulching and you can often harvest through the winter!

With fast-maturing crops such as lettuce and hardy greens, stagger small plantings every few weeks to keep the harvest spread out or you’ll get all your lettuce at one time. 

Of course, you’ll need to follow gardening principles you’d use in the summer. Provide good soil (with organic matter), fertilize with plant food if you wish, and water consistently.

Spring Herbs

Many herbs will grow year-round in Houston, such as basil, rosemary, lavender and lemon balm.

DSC3916

Planting by the season

Spring Planting FAQs

Before Spring planting, it is important to prepare the soil. Remove any weeds, rocks, and debris from your garden beds and loosen soil to help plants root and grow. Adding compost and other organic matter can help improve the soil structure and fertility.

Some popular spring garden plants include annuals, perennials, vegetables, herbs, and fruit trees. Some specific examples include tomatoes, peppers, squash, basil, daffodils, and cherry trees.

When choosing a location for your Spring garden and plants, consider the amount of sunlight, water, and space they need. Most plants need at least 6 hours of sunlight per day, although some can tolerate partial shade. 

We sell both seeds and seedlings. Most customers chose to purchase seedlings that are ready for Spring planting.

To plant seedlings or young plants, first prepare the soil by loosening it and removing any weeds or debris. Then, dig a hole that is large enough to accommodate the root ball of the plant. Carefully remove the plant from its container, taking care not to disturb the roots. Place the plant in the hole and fill it in with soil, making sure to firmly press the soil around the base of the plant. Water the plant well after planting.

The frequency of watering will depend on the specific needs of your plants and the weather conditions. In general, most plants should be watered deeply once or twice a week, depending on the soil moisture level and the weather. It is important to avoid letting the soil dry out completely, but also avoid over-watering, which can lead to root rot.

Some common spring garden pests include aphids, slugs, and caterpillars. To prevent infestations, it is important to regularly inspect your plants and remove any pests that you find. You can also use organic or chemical pest control methods as needed. Some common spring garden diseases include powdery mildew and leaf spot. To prevent these diseases, it is important to follow good gardening practices, such as watering at the base of the plants, avoiding

Fertilizing your spring garden can help provide essential nutrients for plant growth. There are many different types of fertilizers available, including organic and synthetic options. It is important to choose the right type of fertilizer for your plants and to follow the specific application instructions. In general, it is best to fertilize your plants every few weeks during the growing season.

Planting by the Moon (also called “Gardening by the Moon”) is a traditional way to plant your above- and below-ground crops, especially at the start of the season. Here’s how it works:

Plant annual flowers and vegetables that bear crops above ground during the light, or waxing, of the Moon. In other words, plant from the day the Moon is new until the day it is full.

Plant flowering bulbs, biennial and perennial flowers, and vegetables that bear crops below ground during the dark, or waning, of the Moon. In other words, plant from the day after the Moon is full until the day before it is new again.

Old-time farmers swear that this practice results in a larger, tastier harvest, so we’ve included planting by the Moon dates in our planting calendar, too. Learn more about Planting and Gardening by the Moon.

Give the perfect gift every time

Gift Cards

Closed

12PM Christmas Eve
until
8am January 2, 2024

Closed

Thanksgiving Day

Closed

Labor Day

Closed

4th of July

Closed

Memorial Day